The underdog photoblog

Photo

When the wrong side of a colour film is exposed, it results in a reddish exposure. This was an experiment with a Kodak Ultramax 400, on a Spotmatic.

When the wrong side of a colour film is exposed, it results in a reddish exposure.
This was an experiment with a Kodak Ultramax 400, on a Spotmatic.


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Brew-haha: Mixing Chemistry (VitaminC – Metol)

Brew-haha: Mixing Chemistry (VitaminC - Metol)

Perhaps the cheapest developer one can make. All it takes is Sodium Carbonate (5g), Vitamin C (2g) and Metol (0.2g)… dissolved in that order, in 250ml of warm water. You then add enough water to make a 1L solution. That takes care of two 120 rolls.

How much does it cost? Around Rs. 5 in all for the entire solution, excluding water.
All thanks to this link: http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/VitC/vitc.html
This photograph was shot on a Kodak Gold 100 colour film. Pentax K1000 + Rikenon 50mm f2

The solution ended up staying in the fridge for too long and appeared to be far colder than the thermometer said. So developed for 11 minutes. Normal agitation.

Big problem with anything to do with Vitamin C thus far is tablets need to be crushed. Which inevitably tend not to completely dissolve. If one can get hold of the powdered form of ascorbic acid, it will be better.

Grains look a bit weird. But it could be something to do with it being a colour film.

100% crop. Grains look a bit weird. But it could be something to do with it being a colour film.


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Brew-haha: Mixing Chemistry (Gevaert 212)

Brew-haha: Mixing Chemistry (Gevaert 212)

Digital Truth calls this mix the Gevaert 212. It seemed the easiest to make from the chemicals at hand.
More or less the measurements as given below:
http://www.digitaltruth.com/data/gevaert_g212.php

Film was Kodak Gold 100 (colour) 35mm.
Developed for 4 minutes. Agitate the entire first minute. Agitate thrice at regular intervals for 5 seconds, later.

Camera: Pentax k1000
Lens: Vivitar 28mm f2.8
Shutter: 1/15
Aperture: f2.8 (focussed on the flower)
Flower in focus at 100%


An Infrared Test

Got an IR filter rated 850 nm (which is quite useful for black and white infrared photography but not so much to get false colours). It cost next to nothing and the initial tests reveal it is very acceptable. Getting the focus right is a real pain, but when you get somewhere close, the filter does its job.

Shot with a Canon 60D and a Canon 50mm f1.8. Around 15 seconds of exposure at f8 and 1600 ISO. This lens works really well with IR unlike the Tamron 17-50 which would show up a hotspot as big as the aperture.
PS: This building is easily the most photographed one by me.


Root Cross

My recent efforts at photography have revolved around shooting small, natural objects over long exposures with torch lights. For much of the time it is fairly frustrating; inadequate light, too much light, imbalance in light, or slight shift in focus which you’d notice only after packing up and loading images onto the computer. The biggest frustration though is in finding objects to photograph. The first time I did this was when I noticed a small twig which had an incredible texture to it. And I’d instinctively taken to this “miniature light painting” exercise. Much of the inspiration though had come much earlier from watching a documentary on the German photographer Andreas Feininger who, among many other things, photographed small, interesting objects in his studio. About this photograph and its title, the object is part of a tree’s root. We’d dug up a bit of earth from our garden which had now gotten these roots spread by a tree about 3 meters away. The “twig” itself looked a lot like a cross.


Tentacles

A beautifully detailed twig lit by a torch and shot with a Kiron FD mount 70-200mm lens on a Canon 60D. Lens was at 200mm and f11. Long exposure. Ignore what it says about the focal length being 50mm on the left.


The night bunch

A long-exposure of a garden. Lit only by stray street-lights and an open shutter of more than a minute. Canon 60D, Canon 50mm f1.8 II